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Problems

Modeling is an art, and it takes practice. The following examples show the variety of problems that can be attacked by linear programming, and give you the opportunity to try your hand at some problems.

exercise379

exercise382

exercise388

  exercise391

exercise397

exercise400

exercise409

exercise418

exercise432

  exercise435

  exercise440

  exercise445

  exercise450

  exercise454

  exercise458

  exercise464

  exercise470

  exercise474

Answers to Exercise 18:

(a) Let tex2html_wrap_inline811 be the number of toasters produced manually, tex2html_wrap_inline813 be the number produced semiautomatically, and tex2html_wrap_inline965 be the number produced robotically.

The objective is to Minimize tex2html_wrap_inline1217 .

The constraints are:

tex2html_wrap_inline1219 (produce enough toasters)

tex2html_wrap_inline1221 (skilled labor used less than or equal to amount available).

tex2html_wrap_inline1223 (unskilled labor constraint)

tex2html_wrap_inline1225 (assembly time constraint)

tex2html_wrap_inline1227 (nonnegativity of production)

(b) Add a constraint tex2html_wrap_inline1229

(c) Add a variable tex2html_wrap_inline1231 to represent the assembly time slack. Add tex2html_wrap_inline1233 to the objective. Change the assembly time constraint to

tex2html_wrap_inline1235 (assembly time constraint)

tex2html_wrap_inline1237



Michael A. Trick
Mon Aug 24 14:40:57 EDT 1998